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Time for a milling machine?

In a typical home engineering workshop progression, you buy a bench vise, some hand tools, and possibly a bench grinder. After you buy a small pillar drill then comes a big leap — buying a centre lathe.
Along the way you acquire more small tooling, drills, turning tools, etc. You make many useful items and produce a fair bit of scrap.
But then you find the lovely pieces you are turning out on your lathe require other features, especially holes more accurately positioned than you can mark out and drill on your pillar drill. As good as you have become with a file, that flat section needed on the shaft really needs to be machined. And how are you going to make a slot for that keyway?

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Create a coffee table

Making an item of furniture does not have to be the daunting task it can seem. If you look closely at commercial pieces, you’ll notice that they share common concepts, and they are simple concepts at that. I’m not suggesting you suddenly choose to give away purchasing furniture and make all your own but making one or two items can become real statement pieces. Perhaps a hall table, or in this case, a small coffee table.
For this project, instead of choosing a basic option of joining a few narrow boards side-by-side to create a solid top, I chose to try a technique I haven’t used before – using wedges of timber to create a radial effect. For your top, you certainly do not have to go this far, and you can choose to have a solid top (these can even be purchased pre-made), or even a solid slab (with or without a natural edge)

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Build a portable barbeque

At home, I have a big barbecue in the backyard and a little barbecue upstairs on the balcony that I use when there are just two of us. This hibachi or portable barbecue would be ideal for just two although the grill rack is big enough for four or five steaks or chops and sausages. It can be made with scrap mild steel and a piece of cut pipe. You will find scrap bins at your local engineering works. Most pieces of metal under a metre seem to go in there. You could ask and many companies would be happy to help out, perhaps for a couple of beers.

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IoT key driver to growth and leadership opportunities in key industries

A new global survey on the development of the Internet of Things (IoT) across a wide range of industries has revealed some interesting new trends, including a surge in willingness to use AI in some form, increasing concern about connectivity options, and a willingness to establish partnerships to accelerate the delivery of new IoT solutions. 
The Global IoT Survey 2022 was conducted by element14,an Avnet company that specialises in the global distribution of electronic components, products, and solutions — and analysed 2263 qualified responses received between January and March 2022 with the aim of gaining a better understanding of technologies, challenges, and opportunities faced by designers and system integrators of IoT solutions.

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Welding with LPG

Long before MIG welders or fancy plasmas came onto the scene, the art of welding, cutting, and brazing was to work with gas. The hire or exchange cylinders used by sheddies invariably were oxy/acetylene as this was one of the most common processes for welding, cutting, or brazing.
But there is an alternative–liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and oxygen. This combination can be used for heating, bending, brazing, soldering, silver soldering, and flame gouging to name just a few applications.

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The Shed September/October 2022 issue 104 on sale now

The September/October 2022 issue of The Shed, No. 104, has something in it for every sheddie.
Our cover story this issue is on a couple of blokes who are collectors and restorers of stationary engines of all different types and sizes. Tom Gregory and Gary Norton have got the bug bad and both find it hard to go past a stationary engine of any era and any fuel type. Spending time with Tom and Gary as they describe their addiction to these soldiers of past years will surely convert many readers to the joys of stationary engine ownership.
“There is something endearing, almost comical, about the chugging, spinning, and belching machinations of vintage stationary engines.

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Spinning wheel

While we are rather spoilt these days for ready sources of energy, it was once a matter of harvesting what was available in the local environment. More often than not, what was available was a stream or river, and so the workshop was built on the riverbank and the harvesting was achieved by a water wheel.
I’ve always been rather taken by the concept of water wheels (and other mechanical devices that harvest energy from nature), and have been intending to make a small one of my own, even if it was just to be a garden ornamental feature.

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As tough as steel

The chemistry of steel determines why and how it should be tempered.
The potential hardness of a steel is determined by its carbon content. Adding small amounts of other elements to the mix can produce enormous improvements in strength, toughness, and
resistance to rust and the response of the steel to heat treatment.
Steels referred to as alloy steels have additional elements such as chromium, nickel, vanadium,
cobalt, manganese, molybdenum, silicon, and tungsten included.

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Build a grandfather clock case

I had always wanted to build a grandfather clock case and was given the incentive when a client gave me the a modern clock mechanism and a photocopy of a reproduction of an English Tall Case clock to follow. I had to increase the plan dimensions to fit the mechanism, ash wood was chosen and I ended up with 23 metres of approximately 200 x 25mm rough-sawn at an average length of 2.4 metres costing just under $300.
This is not the ideal style of clock case for anything other than an antique clock mechanism. In modern clock mechanisms, the pendulum swing (which should always be tested) needs a straight-waisted trunk style of clock. However, this project has been done to the requirements.

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element14 – your global technology leader

Future proof your business and make sure you are ready and fully equipped for all the challenges of tomorrow with global technology leader element14.
Specialising in high service distribution of technology products and solutions for electronic system design, production, maintenance, and repair, element14 draws on years of experience to support its broad customer base. Offering a tailor-made pathway to a range of services and products for everyone from hobbyists to engineers, maintenance engineers, and buyers, it has a track record of working with both leading brands and start-ups to develop new products.

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Unpublished photos from our visit to the home shed of Stan the Builder

With the Pacific Ocean rolling to shore just across the road from his shed at Wainui Beach, avid surfer and passionate sheddie, Stan Scott, is never too far from his two favourite places.
As far as careers in the building trades go Stan’s has been one out of the box, driven largely by his insatiable curiosity and his never-say-never attitude. Building he says, has taken him places he never dreamed of going. Stan is a familiar face to many Kiwi’s. He has built and presented on a raft of TV renovation shows; is the current brand ambassador for Mitre10 and has even managed a few how-to spreads for us at The Shed.
When he’s not busy planning, building, filming and fronting Mitre10’s web based DIY series’ or giving instore presentations across the country, Stan is home juggling his own building jobs with personal projects and family life.

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The Shed July/August 2022 issue 103 on sale now

Our cover article for this issue is on how to do lost wax casting. Lost wax casting is one of those workshop processes that are so very useful for replicating parts or just being creative. In this issue #103 of The Shed, we begin a three-part series showing how to do your own lost wax casting to cast bronze. Our teacher is David Reid and it is his own technique that he has perfected over 50 years of casting and teaching: the David Reid Technique. With only the absolute minimum of tools and products, everyone will be able to cast like a pro after following his step-by-step process.
Also in this issue; Making Japanese panels, make a classic wooden workbench, metal garden structures, model railways and much more.

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Assorted nuts

For our purposes, a nut is an internally threaded part which is rotated or screwed onto an externally threaded part such as a screw, bolt or stud. If you can pick it up in your hand and put it onto an externally threaded item and tighten it, it is a nut. There will be some exceptions to this which will become apparent.

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The Auckland Blade Show is back for 2022

The Auckland Blade Show is back, bigger and better than ever.
Come along to the Ellerslie Event Centre on the 24th and 25th of September to get your hands on the finest custom blades in the country. With over 30 makers exhibiting, we have hunting knives, kitchen knives, and even swords and axes.

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Hexagon head bolt or cheese head screw?

There are so many types and kinds of bolts and screws that when you ask for the one you need, it is best if you understand the characteristics of the particular fastener. Then you can ask exactly for what you want. These characteristics are:
* Head type;
* Size;
* Thread form;
* Tensile strength;
* Finish.

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